sticky: mapping the long way round.

follow the red line to see how we make our way around australia. the orange line is how we plan to continue … but that could change depending on how things turn out.

emu man.

we are back in broome for a few days. we could have gone directly to derby but since we have to wait for some postal deliveries we figured we could divide the time between broome and derby (broome being the bigger place with probably more things to do and see). one thing we felt we…

fire!

nothing to worry about, we are still in one piece and not even slightly singed. we lit a tiny fire and grilled some sausages (well, nat did anyway). a bit further up the peninsula someone took that idea to a whole new level. we could see the fire burn on the other side of the…

rattling around the dampier peninsula.

we are spending the next few days on the dampier peninsula, north of broome. it’s not very hard to get to but there is a rough 80 km stretch of unsealed road before – surprisingly – the rest of the way to cape leveque is again black top. at this point, after having been subjected to…

snubbies.

roebuck bay is a special place. as cameron from broome whale watching explained, it all has to do with the massive tides here in broome, which can get up to 10 meters. because of these movements there is an incredible amount of water being moved in and out of the bay twice (!) every day.…

walking with dinosaurs.

we hinted previously that there are a few reasons to come to broome. the thing that initially attracted people – and that continues to this day – were the pearls. initially the pearls were harvested by free divers. in the 19th century the industry switched to the deep sea diving suits, the kind that’s made…

what are we doing in broome?

the obvious answer is that you really can’t avoid it if you want to go east across the top. well you could, it is actually a little detour (towards the west) but why would you? the sunset is just as amazing as anywhere on the western seaboard. that alone should be worth a stay. here…

sunset on 80 mile beach.

the last few days we camped at 80 mile beach. sounds a little over the top? when aussies say something is an ’80 mile beach’ it probably is actually that long, or at least not far off. it does have this certain endless feel to it, and then there is also the distinct lack of…

the emu in the sky.

one of the great things about the outback is … the night sky. there is very little if any light pollution like we find in the bigger cities. in europe i don’t think you will see anything like this – ever. have a look at this. on the very right side of the picture in…

red moon rising.

maybe you have never heard of karratha and quite possibly you are unsure just about where on the map to start looking for it. there is a better chance you have a basic idea if you a/ work in mining or b/ are heavily into petroglyphs, as outlined here. there is, however, something else to…

back to the drawing board.

the burrup peninsula. famous for two things: mining operations and aboriginal rock art. this tiny planet sums it up: the hills of red rocks with art among the oldest on the planet on one side, a gas plant on the other. to us this may look like nothing more than a field of rubble, and…

good bye ningaloo.

when we planned the trip i was adamant i wanted to spend  a lot of time in coral bay and exmouth – kris wasn’t sure it was going to be worth it. fair enough: she isn’t particularly confident in the water, doesn’t dive and doesn’t really enjoy boats either. ask her now. seeing a brilliantly…

can’t leave … just yet.

we had to leave exmouth today. sure, we could have extended the stay but with the school holidays starting we would have had to move to another site and we figured if we have to move anyway we might … go back to coral bay. before we leave the reef we would like to do…